The world quests aren’t necessarily bad, but they aren’t good either. I wouldn’t mind killing five of a type of monster or fighting one particular boss a few times, but after seven or eight, it starts to wear pretty thin. But going from levels in the mid-20s can take nearly 30,000 AP, so you’ll need more than world quests if you want to get your heart up in a reasonable time.


Guilds are perhaps one the most effective ways of progressing your character, and in turn, making money. Most 'high-end' guilds have a guild bank where members donate items for other members. This may range from potions, reagents, and craftable plans. Usually you will have to donate to a guild bank in order to receive items as well as stay active in your guild, but receiving potions that will aid your progression and craftable plans allowing you to profit off selling the products will benefit you in the long run. Also, donating to your guild bank may mean donating something you cannot use in turn receiving something you can use. Sometimes, additional services such as VoIP servers are provided and play a key role especially in end-game content; communication is paramount to a the success of an efficient group. Efficiency results in receiving gear faster, running more frequently in a shorter amount of time, and in turn making more money from runs. In a well put together guild, members become a close knit community including financial and questing support, which are among the most profitable benefits. If you have not considered joining a guild as part of your strategy moving through the game, you may wish to strongly reconsider.
This spot actually kicks BOOTAY.  And I only say that because it's so hidden, unique and quirky that I had to add it to this list, despite it being a method rather than a farm.  Generally what you want to do is some sneaky arbitrage.  We'll be buying the items Royal olive, Dalapeno Pepper, River onion, and Muskenbutter from the vendor for 2g – and reselling them to the AH for 4g+. This is an awesome way to take advantage of players laziness and the demanding reagent requirements for some of the higher end recipes.  By selling from the vendor to AH, you can make easy gold – in fact I suspect most cooks do not know these reagents can be purchased from NPC's.
When buying raw materials from the AH, keep an eye out for bargains. Choose only the cheapest items available to keep costs down. Try scanning the whole section of item listings in the AH to check prices; often the prices for stacks of items in the AH are much cheaper than individual pieces (for example, a single Thorium Bar may be priced at 3 , but a stack of 10 may actually be priced at only 2 per Thorium Bar) — you may spend more to acquire your materials, but you also save more and ensure larger profit in the long run. You can find a lot of terrific bargains this way.
Most raids tend to have Bind on Equip loot dropping, and some of these pieces look very good! That means people will pay nicely for them. They aren't bad either for leveling purposes. WOD raids are an excellent choice, as each piece usually always sells for several thousand gold, many even closer to ten thousand instead. Let's take a closer look a those drop rates!
Nov 5 Demon Hunter Low Dps So i finished the starting zone for demon hunter and i found out im not doing any dps what so ever. Everyone tells me that thier doing something towards 14k after leaving the starting zone. But the max im ever gotten with any move is 300. Im level 100 with the gear what im supposed to leave with and for some reason im doing significantly lower dps than the usual player. Any help?Zexguru3 Nov 5
Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1
TSM has a very steep learning curve, as it is a total profession framework. It does not hold your hand, and requires a lot of setup. Luckily you can import settings from other players and there are a ton of settings out there. I have published most of my settings in my pastebin here. You can also check out Sheyrahs. If you want to learn it from the ground up I suggest one of the following guides: PhatLewts, Sheyrah, WTBGold.
Improper leveling of your production profession skills can cost a small fortune. Heck, even proper leveling of some production skills can cost a small fortune. And keep in mind that equipment you produce using your profession will typically be slightly worse than equipment otherwise obtainable at your level via the Auction House and/or instances. It is therefore strongly recommended not to take on a production trade skill until you hit at least level 30, or better yet, level 70+. However, if you are determined to take on such a profession (particularly under level 30), read a suitable leveling guide in order to gain whatever skill level you desire for the least amount of money.
The other addons are a great addition to the repertoire of the gold maker. Some add percentages and buying lists, while others provide price and revenue graphs to the reader. Chatter even allows you to repeat those WTS messages without sifting through pointless gossip and chatter. The in-depth workings of them will come later, as for now, more basic setup needs to be covered first.
Guild Banners. The Banner of Cooperation and Battle Standard of Coordination will increase the experience from kills. They both have a 10 minute cooldown, but when you use one, the other is only locked out for 2 minutes. I was very bad about using these, so it might be worth using a macro to drop them on your first attack against an enemy. Keep in mind you must have reputation with your guild before being able to buy these, so new character may have a bit of a wait before picking them up.
Most classes in World of Warcraft start at first level, but Death Knights and Demon Hunters are exceptions. They start at level 55 and 98, respectively. This alone can shave a huge chunk of time from your leveling experience. Of course, it only works if you want to play a Death Knight or Demon Hunter, but they’re both solid classics that can dish out damage or tank in a group.
This farm has the same exact perks as the misty coast farm.  You will be able to gather oddly shaped stomachs, butchered meat, and all the trade goods that exist inside of both containers.  The benefit to this farm over the other is that it takes place much closer to the flightmaster and the mobs are much easier to solo.  Therefore, players with a lower item level can get the job done without having to worry about the elites that surround the misty coast spot.  Again, an AWESOME spot for anyone who skins and by far some of the easiest most liquidatable gold you can make this expansion.
The most important part of saving is to never buy equipment unless you're positive that it will increase your earning potential, or significantly speed your character's leveling progress. While it is true that gear is important (particularly for melee combat characters), it is also true that an overemphasis on having great gear before maximum level is dumb. Who cares if you're wearing a green sword at level 43? If you're advancing well, you aren't going to be level 43 for very long anyway. The only gear that currently "counts" is max level gear.
On my server there's a big shortage of Primal Air. I've tried farming it in the past using supposedly the best spot(s), but it was honestly horrible. After looking at the Wowhead for Primal Air I noticed there's actually a transmute recipe for Primal Water to Air. I will say as a warning that it apparently does have a 1 day CD like a lot of transmutes, so for some people it might not be worth the time. But at least on my server, there's not 1 Primal Air on the AH and I know that it's a constant shortage, so at the moment I could make a lot of profit just doing my daily CD for this after getting the recipe. To get the recipe you do have to be revered with the Cenarion Expedition from TBC, and there's guides on Wowhead for grinding out that rep as well. I'd recommend checking the stock of Primal Air on The Undermine Journal for your server, and if it's relatively low and you have at least 1 alchemist, go for it. It could be a decent way of making a little more passive gold, just transmuting one Primal to another. I'm probably actually gonna start rolling another alchemist at some point, and this discovery has definitely prodded me in that direction as doing this transmute won't interfere with other TBC transmutes, because there aren't default TBC transmutes as far as I'm aware.
I generally hate this farming spot, although I remember alot of farmers coming up big here.  For my liking the drop chance on the sprite darter hatchling is very low and I couldnt ever come up with one during this expansion.  HOWEVER, if you do get one, you an make out BIG -  as this pet is non-existent on pretty much every server's AH.  Did I mention it goes for a stunning 150,000g? Yup.  Then add to the fact that many players LOVE this pet, especially girls for some reason...  And you can make a big profit if you get one to drop.  Honestly I hate it, it just rubbed me the wrong way.  You can find it in new thalanar, on the very east side of feralas.  Good luck.
Guide to Obtaining and Selling the WoW Token Buying and selling the WoW Token, which allows players to buy game time with gold, or make extra gold by selling the token on the Auction House. What is Blizzard (Battle.net) Balance Overview of Blizzard (Battle.net) Balance, a currency used to buy Blizzard Entertainment products including World of Warcraft character services. How to Purchase World of Warcraft Game Time The cost of a WoW game time subscription, how to acquire a subscription, gift one, and cancel it, as well as how to play WoW for free.
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