Professions are skills used to create and enhance items (gears). You will start with one skill once your character has learned a profession. When you use the profession, your skill will increase. A profession’s higher skill will allow you to create more powerful items. If you change a primary profession, you will lose any skill you have made with your original profession. So it is important to choose your primary professions wisely.

World of Warcraft offers a lot of ways to make money (gold). There is no one "right" way to make money, although there are some definite wrong ways! Some people like to play the Auction House, some people do their daily quests, some people tend to farm, etc. Many characters do a combination of all three of these along with other activities. Below is a compendium of money-making methods.
Once your character makes it to Outland and beyond, cashflow frees up considerably. The quest rewards are much better than in Azeroth. In fact, a typical character will earn from 1000-1200 in quest rewards and vendor trash while leveling 60-70 in Outland, and perhaps 1400-1600 from 70-80 in Northrend. The tendency is, therefore, to spend more freely after one hits 60. However, it is important for players not to go crazy on their spending once they make it to Hellfire. One thing is, training costs, repair costs, and consumable costs are also higher. More important, there is a large purchase that you are going to want to make at some point after level 60, your first flying mount and skill. The "bird" costs 40, the skill will cost you far more. Not only that, but if you want to fly it in Northrend at level 70, you'll have to shell out another 400 for Cold Weather Flying. And for those characters who will be 'farming' herbs or ore in either Outland or Northrend, an elite flying mount is almost essential, as it helps you gather almost twice as fast. That's another 5000 you'll be looking at. Therefore, budgeting carefully during the 60-80 leveling process is essential to ensuring you have sufficient cash on hand for making those purchases. Saving your pennies early makes that bird appear that much sooner.
The world quests aren’t necessarily bad, but they aren’t good either. I wouldn’t mind killing five of a type of monster or fighting one particular boss a few times, but after seven or eight, it starts to wear pretty thin. But going from levels in the mid-20s can take nearly 30,000 AP, so you’ll need more than world quests if you want to get your heart up in a reasonable time.

AddOns (sometimes called addons, add-ons, or mods) are collections of Lua/XML code that augment, modify, or replace World of Warcraft's default user interface. Addons vary greatly in scope and size — they may display information not presented at all by the default UI, add functionality to the default UI (e.g. additional buttons you can press to do things), modify the default UI's appearance (e.g. by changing colors or positions of UI elements) without changing its functionality, or even replace the default UI entirely.
I made some route changes to the Horde levels 43-44 sections.  I have swapped 44 Dustwallow Marsh with 44 Desolace (the entire sections). This allowed me to do Deadmire (at lvl 43 instead of 38) and then go stop at TB to turn in Deadmire + The Black Shield at the same time, then fly quickly to do the Desolace stuff.  Doing 44 Desolace is now mandatory because I think its faster with the new routes. This will also make the level 53 grind much shorter.  I think these were great changes.
First of all, the value of transmog is decided by rarity and how they look. Some items like Minenarbeithut der Tiefen or Pendel der Verdammnis (they can drop in Uldaman) are worth millions of gold. They are worth so much, because they have a really small chance to drop. Other items are bought well because they look good. Best example in this case is the Glorious set, its legplates Glorreichen Beinplatte reach a 100.000 Gold value easily.
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