I liked the little discount for the weekend special. I was used to buying other expansions that included a 30 game time card, this did not. However I was prompted to spend gold I had build up and saved, previously playing the game, and it cost me 117000 gold deducted from my combined characters on my old main server. Big download, so I had to wait to play it until the next morning. Gameplay is different, I was used to the old talent point system, alas I had 10 lvl 100 characters, max level garrisons and shipyard. I did the only thing thinkable without having to take time to vendor unusable items that I thought had meaning. Created the new class. Tutorial started at 98, to get you to 100 with a slow intro back into the game. Auction house prices are pretty high with how long this game has been around. I hope to play more soon, but not like the hardcore grind years past. All I know is I am spending remaining gold saved on biggest affordable bags, and whatever flight trainings to keep me moving fast. Game looks good, no lag, I already enjoy the storyline again.
At 98 you have the option to drop what you're doing and return to your capitol city to start the quest for your Legion Artifact weapon. However, I do not believe this is necessary to do right away unless you're struggling with kill speed in your current gear. I would recommend waiting for a natural pause, such as hearthing to repair and clear your bags. From 100 to 107 you won't even really fight mobs that often; only just enough to clear the way to any treasure you need to pick up.
Azeroth paid a terrible price to end the apocalyptic march of the Legion’s crusade—but even as the world’s wounds are tended, it is the shattered trust between the Alliance and Horde that may prove hardest to mend. As the fires of war continue to roar, take the battle to both new and familiar lands with the Tides of Vengeance update, and join your allies to champion your faction’s cause.
There’s a mountain of endgame content in Battle for Azeroth, and looking at it from the bottom can be pretty daunting. Between the variety of extra quests and their rewards, gearing up for the game’s hardest dungeons, most competitive PvP or even the first raid can be a tall task. Thankfully, we’re here with a helpful checklist of overall goals in the first few weeks, as well as things to do in the days and weeks after you hit 120 in Battle for Azeroth.
Weak Auras is the most important AddOn for players seeking to master their class and take their gameplay to new heights. If you aspire to do any Mythic raiding, this is the most powerful tool in your kit. Weak Auras allows you to display helpful visuals cues anywhere on your screen, which enable you to play better. Most players use it to track their trinket procs, highlight on screen displays of their most important cooldowns, or track the timers of boss mechanics. It is highly customisable and makes keeping track of your procs and cooldowns effortless. The drawback of Weak Auras is that is has a bit of a learning curve and is not the most user friendly. Weak Auras allows you to import other players data directly into their UI, however, and most players choose to simply import other people's Weak Auras rather than make their own. Weak Auras can be used to create just about anything you can imagine, as it is a LUA scripting tool (essentially an AddOn that creates other AddOns, in-game). This is by far the most essential AddOn for players looking to step into Mythic raiding.
If your pet's health gets too low or its attacks aren't very effective against a certain combatant, you can always switch out your current pet with another companion on your team. Only pets that are considered active (i.e., those in your three Battle Pet Slots), may be switched in and out during the battle. Once the match is over, you can always change up your active pet team, which is useful if one of your pets is low on health or dead.
With G'huun's threat eliminated, the Horde and Alliance return their focus to the war. While the Horde procures the Scepter of the Tides, a legendary artifact capable of controlling the seas, the Alliance dismantles a potential alliance between Sylvanas and the vampiric San'lyan Elves. The Alliance begins to gear up for a preemptive strike against Zandalar, with the goal of crippling the Golden Fleet before it can be used against the Alliance and driving a wedge between the Zandalari and the Horde.
REALMS Aerie Peak Aman'Thul Area 52 Arthas Baelgun Barthilas Blackrock Bleeding Hollow Burning Legion Cenarius Dalaran Darkspear Earthen Ring Emerald Dream Frostmourne Garona Garrosh Hyjal Illidan Kel'Thuzad Kil'jaeden Korgath Lightbringer Mal'Ganis Moon Guard Proudmoore Ravenholdt Sargeras Saurfang Shattered Hand Stormrage Stormreaver Thrall Tichondrius Turalyon Wyrmrest Accord Zul'jin Aegwynn, Bonechewer, Daggerspine, Gurubashi, and Hakkar Agamaggan, Archimonde, Jaedenar, and The Underbog Aggramar and Fizzcrank Akama, Dragonmaw, and Mug'thol Alleria and Khadgar Alexstrasza and Terokkar Altar of Storms, Anetheron, Magtheridon, and Ysondre Alterac Mountains, Balnazzar, Gorgonnash, The Forgotten Coast, and Warsong Andorhal, Scilla, Ursin, and Zuluhed Antonidas and Uldum Anub’arak, Chromaggus, Crushridge, Garithos, Nathrezim, and Smolderthorn Anvilmar and Undermine Arathor and Drenden Argent Dawn and The Scryers Arygos and Llane Auchindoun, Cho'gall, and Laughing Skull Azgalor, Azshara, Destromath, and Thunderlord Azjol-Nerub and Khaz Modan Azuremyst and Staghelm Baelgun and Doomhammer Black Dragonflight, Gul'dan, and Skullcrusher Blackhand and Galakrond Blackwater Raiders and Shadow Council Blackwing Lair, Dethecus, Detheroc, Haomarush, Lethon, and Shadowmoon Bladefist and Kul Tiras Blade's Edge and Thunderhorn Blood Furnace, Mannoroth, and Nazjatar Bloodhoof and Duskwood Bloodscalp, Boulderfist, Dunemaul, Maiev, and Stonemaul Borean Tundra and Shadowsong Bronzebeard and Shandris Burning Blade, Lightning's Blade, and Onyxia Caelestrasz and Nagrand Cairne and Perenolde Cenarion Circle and Sisters of Elune Coilfang, Dark Iron, Dalvengyr, and Demon Soul Dawnbringer and Madoran Darrowmere and Windrunner Dath'Remar and Khaz'goroth Deathwing, Executus, Kalecgos, and Shattered Halls Dentarg and Whisperwind Detheroc and Shadowmoon Draenor and Echo Isles Dragonblight and Fenris Draka and Suramar Drak’Tharon, Firetree, Malorne, Rivendare, Spirestone, and Stormscale Drak'thul and Skywall Dreadmaul and Thaurissan Durotan and Ysera Eitrigg and Shu'halo Eldre’Thalas and Korialstrasz Elune and Gilneas Eonar and Velen Eredar, Gorefiend, Spinebreaker, and Wildhammer Exodar and Medivh Farstriders, Silver Hand, and Thorium Brotherhood Feathermoon and Scarlet Crusade Frostmane, Ner'zhul, and Tortheldrin Frostwolf and Vashj Ghostlands and Kael'thas Gnomeregan and Moonrunner Greymane and Tanaris Grizzly Hills and Lothar Gundrak and Jubei'Thos Hellscream and Zangarmarsh Hydraxis and Terenas Icecrown and Malygos Kargath and Norgannon Kilrogg and Winterhoof Kirin Tor, Sentinels, and Steamwheedle Cartel Lightninghoof, Maelstrom, and The Venture Co Malfurion and Trollbane Misha and Rexxar Mok'Nathal and Silvermoon Muradin and Nordrassil Nazgrel, Nesingwary, and Vek'nilash Quel'dorei and Sen'jin Ravencrest and Uldaman Ravenholdt and Twisting Nether Runetotem and Uther

Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1
Since you’ll already have to complete quite a few World Quests to reach the required reputation levels for the previous achievement, this one should come naturally. It’s worth noting that this achievement specifically requires 100 different World Quests, so if a World Quest pops up that you don’t recall having done before, it’s best to head out and knock it off. Completing "Beachhead" 100 times just won’t cut it, but Scrollsage Nola certainly appreciates your efforts.
Professions: This may seem strange for a leveling guide, but the first opportunity you get, pick up both the Mining and Herbalism gathering professions. Not only will this allow you to track many various quest objectives on your map, but you also get a fair amount of experience whenever you gather. I'd put it at around 10% of a quest turn-in per gather. Since most of your wasted time in WoW is travel time, stopping to gather ore or herbs can keep your exp/h rolling as long as you don't go too far out of your way. You should only gather if it's convenient, and on the way to an actual quest objective. Don't make gathering your priority.
Usually when a wow expansion is nearing, people tend to do a bit of bag cleaning. And by cleaning I mean valuable trade goods are being sold and undercut like crazy, at least on the more popular realms. A great many people are also saying goodbye to their garrisons and spending their last resources on trade goods. Usually the most valuable, so except the prices to get affected as well!
If there would be a transmog server #1, all transmog vendors would transfer there and the market would get destroyed fairly quick. In general, Roleplay-Servers like Argent Dawn or The Aldor are better server for selling transmog. On high pop servers you have a lot of other players selling stuff and as a result, low prices. On low pop servers prices are acceptable, but you have no buyers. So there is not recommendation for a server really. Its up to you.
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