For those interested in more details on spending wisely, and generating good cashflow, we cover a number of topics in more detail. Please note that this guide represents the accumulated wisdom of many people. You don't necessarily have to do all of these things--there is no one "right" way to make and manage money. However, these pointers will give you ideas on how to establish a firm financial foundation for your character.


When assigning a selling price, do not aim for too low a price that would give you too little profit, but certainly do not assign too high a price. Too much greed is never a good thing, and the AH is filled with items that do not sell due to excessive inflation. A very common tactic in the AH is to sell for lower than what another player is offering, and many players make a lot of money that way. Similarly, losing sales thanks to being undercut is never fun. Aim for as low a price you can that will still make you a good profit. If you can keep producing the same item over and over, sell cheaply yet make a good amount of the item, you will reliably make a lot of money by volume. Moving inventory is the best kind of inventory.
The main tool for any serious gold maker is TradeSkillMaster. It is an addon suite with a desktop application that downloads price data and allows you to create rules for easy crafting, mailing, shopping and posting your items on the auction house. It has a premium service that includes e-mail notifications for great deals and importing great deals as a shopping scan.
Make sure you have the two Flight-Path toys purchased, as this can save you time. It won't have EVERY flight path, but will have major locations for faster travel if you need to switch zones entirely(which you will). If you buy the toys on one faction, it unlocks for the other faction as well. So don't spend double the gold! These toys can be found at the heirloom vendor(Undercity for Horde, Ironforge for Alliance)

So gibblewilt is a special NPC. He is the only NPC that drops the Foremens Vest chestpiece.  Generaly this transmog is a bra-less vest – making it VERY popular in the transmog community (I play on moonguard, and are highly invested in the transmog community, so I know).  Anyway, even though the drop chance is hell on high water – snagging one can yield you profits of 50,000g or more. Whats better is usually noone can be found farming him, so you can camp an alliance character nearby, and kill him ever-so-often.  Hes located just outside gnomergan.


YouTuber Oldbess recently uploaded a video about this cool method.  Generally completing the scenario "Deaths of Chromie" will allow you to pick up the item "Time-Lost Wallet" in excess.  You can get it from just killing the mobs or actually completing the scenario in full.  By then end you will have dozens of time lost wallets.  Each wallet awards 50g AND a rare chance at getting the ]bronze proto-whelp[/U] pet.  In the video, this spot was VERY hard for to pull off as it requires a high item level.  With an 809 item level I struggled all throughout the scenario and could not make this spot profitable for the time invested.  The good news is, if you can get it done, the gold you make will be entirely liquidated – the rewards are 50g raw for each wallet turn in.  I suggest you watch it on Oldbess's channel for full details.

Sep 1 Blindsight's How to Choose a Server Guide [Originally posted by Blindsight-Spirestone on the old Warcraft forums--it's my understanding he no longer posts, but this is a valuable and informative guide] Since it's a frequently asked question on these boards, I've thrown together a quick guide for how to pick a server. Server Datacentre Location - New York, Chicago, Phoenix, Los Angeles First and foremost: Limit your search to servers that are as close to you (physically) as possible. Closer servers will have better latency, and thus deliver a better play experience. WoWWiki has a great list by datacentre: http://www.wowwiki.com/US_realm_list_by_datacenter Realm Type - PvP, PvE, RP, RP-PvP Now that you know which servers to look at, the next most important question is if you want to play on a PvE, PvP, RP, or RP-PvP server. RP vs. non-RP servers should be a simple choice: when interacting with other players, do you want to act "in character" replying to other players like they're living inside the world of Azeroth, or would you rather just play WoW like any other video game treating everyone else like a player at a keyboard? If you want to play on an RP server with active RPers: "Wyrmrest Accord and Moon Guard are very popular, but Moon Guard is very over populated." -Nok PvE vs. PvP is a bit of a tougher decision. On a PvP server, once you get to about lvl 20, in just about every questing zone you go to you can be attacked at any time by any player of the opposite faction (Horde vs. Alliance). If you like the idea of jumping other players while they're running around killing mobs/questing, this may be for you. If you don't like the idea of a max lvl player killing you in 1 shot when they ride by, then you may want to stick to PvE servers. Some people feel that PvP servers have a slightly more mature community since most children and/or immature players can't stand being killed randomly. Other people feel that PvP servers have a less mature community since it's full of teenagers who like to grief other players while they're just trying to quest. YMMV. Realm population - New, Low, Medium, High, Full The next major consideration for choosing a realm is the realms' population, both the total number of players and the Alliance / Horde ratio. This is a bit more complicated, and there are different ways of looking at the data. First, WarcraftRealms.com has a tool for taking a "census" of various realms, but it relies on data uploads from players on the server. Its data is only as accurate as the data it receives from player uploads, but it gives a pretty good baseline idea: http://www.warcraftrealms.com/realmstats.php?sort=Total Another useful way to look at population data is in terms of server age. Older servers tend to have higher populations. WoWWiki has a list of all US realms' creation dates: http://www.wowwiki.com/Timeline_of_the_creation_of_US_realms So that's great, but what does it mean? How does population affect the game? Here are a few points to consider: Empty servers: By far the easiest way of ruining the MMO experience is to have nobody to play with. Avoid servers with very low population. Queues: Very high population realms often have queue times. This could mean waiting for half an hour every time you want to play during prime time. During prime time (weekday evenings and weekends), check the realm status page to see if the server is listed as full: http://www.worldofwarcraft.com/realmstatus/ Economy: Higher population realms have more robust economies. This means the auction house will have many more items listed and will be much more competitive. 10/25 Man Raid PuGs: Higher population => more things happening => more groups going all the time. Pick up Groups will form more frequently and will fill faster, meaning you can play more and sit in town waiting for groups less. This also, however, means (on some servers) that PuGs can be more picky in who they take along since anyone can be replaced quickly. A/H ratio: Depending on how you like to play, you may want an even ratio so that everything that involves opposite faction interaction (like world PvP) are more fair, or you may want to be on the advantage side of an imbalanced ratio so that your side is usually winning. The only disadvantage with being on the plus side of a wildly imbalanced population is that soon, world PvP zones (i.e. Wintergrasp) will only allow the same number of players (beyond a minimum level of 20 players) from each faction in at the same time, so if nobody from the other side shows up, only 20 from your side can get in.Frejya117 Sep 1
Enchanting is a crafting profession that allows you to enchant gear with stat increases. It also allows you to disenchant gear for crafting materials. Enchanting uses crafting materials that can only be obtained from disenchanting gear. This means the only source is either crafting yourself or buying from other players. As the profession mostly revolves around stat increases only the legion recipes are relevant. Enchanting is also a great source of obliterum. The other ways to make gold with the profession is crafting and selling enchants and doing the enchanting shuffle.

Even if you don’t have flying in WoD be sure to get the WoD handy notes. If you have flying simply fly and pick up all the treasures that you can and do bonus objectives. Not every single piece of treasure will be worth it though as some are hidden in caves or are just hard to get. So if you find yourself spending more than a few minutes finding a treasure, just skip it and move on, there is plenty of treasure to go around.


The most simple thing is TradeSkillMaster. This AddOn shows you quite an amount of information in the items tooltip. In my opinion, DBRegionMarketAvg the best source. It tells me the price, an item was posted on all EU realms in the last 14 days. Why not DBMarket? DBMarket only shows you the items value from your server in the last 14 days. This value often gets manipulated. Some people start to post an item with a 500g value for 500.000 Gold on the auction house for several weaks. As a consequence, DBMarket is rising towards 500.000 Gold.  If you use DBMarket with 100% and post your item for 500.000 Gold, nobody will buy it.
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