Once your character makes it to Outland and beyond, cashflow frees up considerably. The quest rewards are much better than in Azeroth. In fact, a typical character will earn from 1000-1200 in quest rewards and vendor trash while leveling 60-70 in Outland, and perhaps 1400-1600 from 70-80 in Northrend. The tendency is, therefore, to spend more freely after one hits 60. However, it is important for players not to go crazy on their spending once they make it to Hellfire. One thing is, training costs, repair costs, and consumable costs are also higher. More important, there is a large purchase that you are going to want to make at some point after level 60, your first flying mount and skill. The "bird" costs 40, the skill will cost you far more. Not only that, but if you want to fly it in Northrend at level 70, you'll have to shell out another 400 for Cold Weather Flying. And for those characters who will be 'farming' herbs or ore in either Outland or Northrend, an elite flying mount is almost essential, as it helps you gather almost twice as fast. That's another 5000 you'll be looking at. Therefore, budgeting carefully during the 60-80 leveling process is essential to ensuring you have sufficient cash on hand for making those purchases. Saving your pennies early makes that bird appear that much sooner.
We can’t be sure when we'll see flying in Battle for Azeroth, but it helps to be as prepared as possible by completing the available achievement Battle for Azeroth Pathfinder, Part One to ensure you’ll be well on your way to fly the less-than-friendly skies when you can. In the meantime, earning this achievement will grant you increased passive mount speed on Kul’Tiras and Zandalar.  Here’s what you can do to work your way towards unlocking flying in World of Warcraft's Battle for Azeroth!
There’s a mountain of endgame content in Battle for Azeroth, and looking at it from the bottom can be pretty daunting. Between the variety of extra quests and their rewards, gearing up for the game’s hardest dungeons, most competitive PvP or even the first raid can be a tall task. Thankfully, we’re here with a helpful checklist of overall goals in the first few weeks, as well as things to do in the days and weeks after you hit 120 in Battle for Azeroth.
Unless low quality items have some known quest use or are coveted by other players, you should try to sell it as soon as possible to create bag space. Always (or almost always, see above exceptions) keep things like cloth, leather, herbs, or large stacks of white/gray items over other loot when you have to decide what to keep when your bags get full. It might be worth your while to invest in larger bags (10-20 slot), especially if you know a tailor.

Enchants. I honestly wasn't 100% certain which enchants were best, since scaling has screwed up a lot of things. IMO, just pick the enchant for each armor slot that has the highest bonus without level restrictions. The exception is that you'll definitely want Mark of the Hidden Satyr for your neck piece, and probably Elemental Force for your weapon. Both of these proc consistently and strongly across all levels.
If i start on a new realms, I am farming a lot of transmog from classic and Burning Crusade Dungeons and Raids. In the beginning, i start to post them if they have at least a DBRegionMarketAvg (Average value of an item on all EU realms of the last 14 days) of 500 Gold. All the other items get vendored. The time you hit a stock of 1000 Items, my value treshold raises to around 2.500 Gold. All the items below that value get vendored aswell. Newly farmed items that are above these treshold will be listed. Why? If I start over somewhere, I want to get a certain amount of gold quickly. Cheap items are great for that. Later on, to save time, Quality is better than quantity. As mentioned above, re-posting the items on the auction house takes quite a bit of time. At this point, I can recommend you the TradeSkillMaster AddOn, it makes your auction house work really a hell of a lot easier.
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